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Tom Campbell. Freelance Radio Presenter.

So you wanna try this "being a radio presenter" thing but you've not got a scooby-do where the road begins? Worry not, everybody started in Parts Unknown! Thankfully, you don't need a Masters in playing the hits or a degree in Wireless Wizardry. 

If you've got a voice, something to say and confidence to spare then you could just be these FIVE TIPS AWAY from getting your journey underway!

1. DO

I know, I know. You wanna be a full-time radio presenter so the first tip being "BE A RADIO PRESENTER" might be redundant, but it's important. Start building your on-air miles whether it's on a community station, a hospital radio station or an Internet radio station.  None of those on offer?

Why not get a microphone and upload something to Mixcloud, Soundcloud or even Facebook Live. However and wherever you do it, just start talking into a microphone between some songs. It doesn't need to be perfect, you just need to do it! My first radio show was recorded onto a cassette tape via my karaoke machine, so I guarantee you'll have more listeners on your first show than I did!

2. LISTEN

How often do you actually listen to radio? A lot of people I meet don't really listen to any.  The best thing you can do - whatever your level - is to listen around. Ignore the songs (you won't get to choose them down the road), the adverts (you don't control them either) and the jingles (they're nice and all but they won't make you a great presenter, don't obsess with them!)

Focus on the person behind the microphone. What do they do? What do they say? How do they say it? What do you like about it? What DON'T you like about it? This is a crucial part in finding your voice! 

3. LISTEN

That's not a type-o, tip three is the same as tip two...kind of! Once you've started doing shows of your own, however you do them, listen back to them. It's perfectly normal to critique yourself, but it's also perfectly normal to be happy with your work too! 

It's not arrogant to hear something you did and think "yeah, I think I nailed that!" - confidence is important. Know what you do well and work on what you don't do so well.

4. SHOUT

That stuff you think you've nailed? Tell people about it! Take all the good stuff you've done and ask your peers for their thoughts/opinions/suggestions. Through the power of the internet it's so easy to get in touch with radio people (heck, this website you're currently on is a GOLD MINE of links, guides and contacts for you) so put your greatest hits out there. 

Tweet your stuff to me (@TomCampbell) if you want, I'm happy to take a listen, all I ask is that you're polite with it. If you tweet with "Here, get a load of this and give me a job!" I simply won't answer you. Manners cost nothing!

5. LISTEN

It's amazing how a talking requires so much listening, right!? If you get feedback from peers, radio presenters or programme directors then take it on board. They might give you some food for thought, maybe a fresh way of looking at something. Industry guidance will come from a good place and is designed to make you better. Be open minded about the feedback and keep it in mind next time you're doing your thing.

Hopefully you've not got some idea of the direction you're heading in! The most important part of any journey is the first step...so get steppin' and I'll meet you at the bus stop a bit further down!

 

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